Mosque in the upper precinct of the temple dedicated to Aphrodite -remains.


Acrocorinth castle: traces of Aphrodite temple / mosque at the top of the citadel (Google earth).

At the highest point of the northeastern summit of the mountain at a height of 575 m., stood the temple of Aphrodite, to whom according to a legend, Acrocorinth was granted by Helios.
Excavations revealed the remains of a small prostyle temple dated early from the 5th-4th c. B.C., on a former site of an archaic temple, attributed to the 7th-6th c.

According to Carl William Blegen, who excavated the area in the first decades of the 20th c., the area was described as following (Blegen Carl, "Excavations at the summit", Cambridge University Press, 1930, p. 3):

“…The remains still in situ are very scanty indeed, but they represent no fewer than seven successive structures: a small building of the sixth or even the seventh century B. C.; a larger edifice, doubtless the Temple of Aphrodite, probably of the fifth century and later; an early Christian Church; a large mediaeval Tower; a Turkish Mosque surrounded by a cloister; a paved platform, presumably of Venetian times; and a small hut of miserable construction, dating perhaps from the early nineteenth century. …
… and in p. 25,
Two little small Turkish mosques seem to have succeeded in turn the Christian church, both erected in the area south of the nave of the latter and east of the great tower. The first was very small, and only a portion of its foundations have survived. The second, almost directly overlying the first, was square in plan, measuring about six metres on a side. Remains of the mihrab were still preserved in the middle of its southeastern wall, as shown in the plan (PLATE III). This second mosque seems to have stood within a walled court, with a cloister-like series of rooms along its northern border. All these buildings had been erected with free use of poros material from the Greek Temple.”

After the Byzantine tower lookout post (9th-10th c.) was built, later a mosque took the place of the former constructions and finally a Venetian artillery platform.
Mosque close to the third Gate Hammam (remains) close to the third Gate

Sources


Athanasoulis Demetrios, To Κάστρο Ακροκορίνθου και η ανάδειξή του (2006-2009), 25η Εφορεία Βυζαντινών Αρχαιοτήτων, Hellenic Ministry of Culture Publication, Ancient Corinth 2009, p. 26.
Blegen C. William, Stillwell Richard, Broneer Oscar, Bellinger Alfred, Corinth, Results of excavations, vol. III, part I, “Acrocorinth excavations in 1926”, Blegen Carl, Excavations at the summit, Cambridge University Press, 1930, plates I-III and p. 3, 25.
Koumoush Anastasia, Ακροκόρινθος, εκδ. Τ.Α.Π., Αthens 2008, p. 34.

Eleni I. Kanetaki

State Plan of Acrocorinth: Temple of Aphrodite and church (Plate II), Stillwell, R. (ASCSA, Corinth Drawing: 260 005: State Plan of Acrocorinth: Temple of Aphrodite and church), http://ascsa.net/id/corinth/drawing/260%20005?q=Corinth%20Drawing%3A%20260%20005%3A%20State%20Plan%20of%20Acrocorinth%3A%20keep&t=drawing&v=icons&sort=&s=2State Plan of Acrocorinth: Temple of Aphrodite and church (Plate III), State Plan of Acrocorinth: North Bastion,  Stillwell, R. (ASCSA, Corinth Drawing: 260 010: State Plan of Acrocorinth: Temple of Aphrodite and church), http://ascsa.net/id/corinth/drawing/260%20010?q=c%20260%20010&t=&v=icons&sort=&s=1

lll, Athanasoulis Demetrios, To Κάστρο Ακροκορίνθου και η ανάδειξή του (2006-2009), 25η Εφορεία Βυζαντινών Αρχαιοτήτων, Hellenic Ministry of Culture Publication, Ancient Corinth 2009, p. 26.lezanta

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