Mosque B, dedicated to Mehmed the Conqueror


Acrocorinth castle: the site of Sultan Mehmed mosque (Mosque B) (Google earth).

Evliya Celebi mentions the existence of four mosques in the Muslim quarter of Acrocorinth: the Fatih, Beyzade, Ahmed Paşa and Fetihye cami.
The building named as “Mosque B” according to the Greek Ministry of Culture’s official website, is situated on the platform over the large Byzantine reservoir, at the right of the main street which runs up the castle and was dedicated to Mehmed the Conqueror (Fatih cami). The building was converted by the Venetians into a church of St. Paul.
The mosque must have had a rectangular shaped ground floor plan, measuring 9,00x17,00 m (general dimensions, after a former architectural survey). The plan offered by MacKay shows significant errors… Its entrance was placed at the northwestern side, as traces of the foundations’ masonry testify. The place of the semicircular mihrab niche can also be evidenced.
Today only a free-standing octagonal shaped base (of irregular sides) of the minaret with a spiral stair survives. The shaft of the minaret has not survived, only the conical cap -transition element from the shaft to the base- remains. The narrow opening of the base is crowned with a pointed arch. The masonry of the minaret consists of well-trimmed and well fitted poros stones (limestone).

According to the description given by Evliya Celebi in his Seyahatname, there were two sources of fresh water, situated close by, either below the mosque, or directly underneath it.
Ahmed Pasamosque Mosque close to the third Gate

Sources

Carpenter Rhys and Bon Antoine, with contributions by A. W. Parsons, Corinth, Results of excavations, vol. III, part II, “The Medieval Fortifications of Acrocorinth and Vicinity”, in “The Defenses of Acrocorinth and the Lower Town”, Cambridge University Press, 1936, p. 263, 264.

Chrysafi-Zografou Metaxoula, “Τουρκικά κτίσματα στην Κόρινθο. Κρήνες και θρησκευτικά κτήρια”, ΥΠΠΕ, Τεχνική Περιοδική ΈκδοσηΑναστήλωση-Συντήρηση-Προστασία Μνημείων και Συνόλων, τ. Α΄, Αthens 1984, p. 269.

MacKay Pierre, “Acrocorinth in 1668, a Turkish Account”, in Hesperia, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1968), published by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, pp. 389-391.

http://odysseus.culture.gr/h/2/gh251.jsp?obj_id=19515, official website of the Greek Ministry of Culture

Eleni I. Kanetaki

The Byzantine reservoir platform and remains of  Sultan Mehmed's mosque (and its minaret).Indications of the remaining foundations from Sultan Mehmed's mosque and its minaret.Surviving masonry from Sultan Mehmed's mosque's foundations.lRemains of the mihrab niche.Sultan Mehmed mosque: its minaret.Sultan Mehmed mosque: its minaret.Sultan Mehmed mosque: its minaret.Sultan Mehmed mosque: the entrance to its minaret.Sultan Mehmed mosque: the conical pyramidoidal shaft of its minaret, St. Demetrios church at the right.Morea-Acrocorinth, Fatih C. minaret from Machiel Kiel’s digital archivelezantaGround floor plan  of Sultan Mehmed's mosque (MacKay Pierre, “Acrocorinth in 1668, a Turkish Account”, in Hesperia, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1968), published by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, p. 394).











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